#1 Best Probiotic for Leaky Gut – is a Postbiotic

Finding the best probiotic for leaky gut can be difficult and time-consuming. But we can make it easier for you. Hint: you can find it in a patented BREAKTHROUGH postbiotic. More about that later. But first, let’s discuss leaky gut and probiotics.

What is Leaky Gut Syndrome?

Leaky gut syndrome is a condition that affects the lining of the intestines. It occurs when toxins, food particles, bacteria, and other harmful substances leak into the bloodstream. Normally, the intestinal barrier prevents this from happening.

You see, the intestinal barrier is composed of a series of cells linked together by what’s called, “tight junctions.” This creates tight openings, or gates, in the intestinal wall that allow water and nutrients to pass through the barrier into the bloodstream, while keeping harmful substances inside. With leaky gut syndrome, these openings become wide enough to allow toxins, bacteria, food particles and other substances to enter the bloodstream.1

Many factors can cause these openings to widen, a condition called “intestinal permeability.” Research suggests imbalances in gut bacteria can cause gut inflammation, leading to increased intestinal permeability.2

Research shows leaky gut syndrome may contribute to many health conditions, including:

  • Diabetes
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Irritable bowel disease (IBS)
  • Headaches
  • Joint pain3

…and much more.

Why Probiotics?

Many people use probiotics to rebalance their gut bacteria, lessening their risk of developing leaky gut syndrome.

Probiotics are live microorganisms found in fermented foods such as sauerkraut or yogurt. They can also be taken in supplement form. The problem in using probiotics to fix leaky gut is that they may not address what is perhaps the biggest cause of leaky gut syndrome — gut inflammation.

Instead, probiotics just add more beneficial microbes to your gastrointestinal tract. While this could be beneficial for your overall health, they also typically create more gas and bloating. (That’s because probiotics are developed through a fermentation process, which causes gas.) 4  Plus, they still eat (ferment) fiber in your colon, creating still more gas.

What should you do about leaky gut, then? Choose a postbiotic, of course.

Choose a Postbiotic!

When probiotics eat (ferment) fiber in your lower colon, they excrete waste products, collectively called postbiotics. Once thought to be a useless byproduct of bacterial fermentation, postbiotics may help fix leaky gut and other health conditions.

Research shows that one type of postbiotic, a short-chain fatty acid called butyrate, reduces inflammation in your gut by regulating your immune response.5  This may help keep the gates in your intestinal barrier tight so that they do not allow toxins to seep into your bloodstream. Butyrate has also been shown to provide many other health benefits.6

In other words, butyrate is a GREAT postbiotic for leaky gut. However, to keep it from breaking down before it gets to your colon, it needs glycerol molecules added to it. Where can you find such a formula? TRIButyrate. This patented BREAKTHROUGH discovery has helped thousands of amazed users fix their leaky gut and other gut issues.

>>Discover the super patented form of this gut-healing ingredient clinically proven to help fix your digestive issues and end your bathroom misery.

SOURCES

1- Eske J. What to know about leaky gut syndrome. MedicalNewsToday. Medically reviewed by Saurabh Sethi, M.D.Last medically reviewed on August 21, 2019.

2- Morris G,  Berk M, Carvalho AF, Caso JR, Sanz Y, Maes M. The Role of Microbiota and Intestinal Permeability in the Pathophysiology of Autoimmune and Neuroimmune Processes with an Emphasis on Inflammatory Bowel Disease Type 1 Diabetes and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Current Pharmaceutical Design. Volume 22 , Issue 40 , 2016.

3- Eske J. What to know about leaky gut syndrome. MedicalNewsToday. Medically reviewed by Saurabh Sethi, M.D.Last medically reviewed on August 21, 2019.

4- Science behind the probiotics. UAS Labs.

5- Andoh A, Bamba T, Sasaki M. Physiological and anti-inflammatory roles of dietary fiber and butyrate in intestinal functions. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 1999 Sep-Oct;23(5 Suppl):S70-3.

6- Andoh A, Bamba T, Sasaki M. Physiological and anti-inflammatory roles of dietary fiber and butyrate in intestinal functions. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 1999;23(5 Suppl):S70-S73. doi:10.1177/014860719902300518